Musandam
Oman

The Sultanate of Oman is situated on the southeast corner of the Arabian Peninsula and is located between Latitudes 16° 40' and 26° 20' North and Longitudes 51° 50' and 59° 40' East. The coastline extends 1,700 Km from the Strait of Hormuz in the north, to the borders of the Republic of Yemen in the south and overlooks three seas: the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea. The Sultanate borders Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the West; the United Arab Emirates in the Northeast, the Republic of Yemen in the South; the Strait of Hormuz in the North and the Arabian Sea in the East. The Musandan Peninsula forms the country's northern tip and is separated from the rest of the Sultanate by United Arab Emirates' eastern coast and includes the only coast the Sultanate has on the Arabian Gulf.

 

The total land area is around 309,500 Km2 and it is the third largest country in the Arabian Peninsula. The Sultanate of Oman has one of the oldest civilizations in the Arabian Peninsula, dating back thousands of years with notable periods of greatness in the ancient world and in medieval times. Like other great civilizations, Oman faded from prominence - until the recent resurgence under the wise and able leadership of His Majesty Sultan Taboos Bin Said. All along, the country was active in many ways and has an interesting history that is still relevant today and has left many tangible traces in prominent landmarks and a highly developed culture. The interior of Oman has some spectacular mountain scenery and colorful village environs to offer the outdoor explorer. The beaches have excellent quality sand grains. The countryside is dotted with large forts dating from the 17th and 18th centuries. Tarmac road networks link the remotest areas Motels in the interior offer comfortable overnight lodging for those desiring a base. In short, there is a great variety of exploring possibilities both, for the day-tripper and for the overnight camper. We cannot, however, overemphasize the need to respect local villagers and their customs in our sightseeing adventures. The ability to explore freely is a privilege that must not be misused. Some principles of etiquette are outlined below. Please follow them carefully so that no one causes offences and we can all continue to enjoy the impressive countryside.

Sights and sounds of Oman
Muscat

Muscat Governorate is considered the pulsating heart of Oman. It is linked to Port Sultan Qaboos by Muttrah Corniche where the visitor to Muscat can view the wonderful variety of nature: golden beaches, mountainous heights, and golden sand dunes (Bawshar Sands). Perhaps what is striking about Muscat Governorate and its states is the breathtaking intermingling of ancient cultural heritage and modern style. You will see houses, gates, old markets, small shops, and winding roads redolent of authentic history, side by side with modern markets, shops, buildings, and streets stamped with modern architecture. This allows Oman to preserve its historic character, and at the same time enjoying its contemporary spirit. Muscat is renowned as one of the cleanest Arab capitals, and has gained the honour of winning the Cleanest Arab City Contest several consecutive times.

Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque
Mutrah Souq
Barr Al Jissah
Sur

The city of Sur is one of the ancient Omani cities. It is a city that has played a prominent and distinguished role in maritime commercial activity across the Indian Ocean, the Arabian Sea and the Sea of Oman, forming a business and cultural bridge between the Arabian Peninsula, India, South East Asia and Africa. Sur Port is amongst the oldest ports, where more than one hundred and fifty sailing vessels docked daily during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It is the most easterly city in Arabia and the first one to witness sunrise in this part of the world. Sur used to be an important shipbuilding centre of vessels that crossed the oceans. This wilaya has a number of famous ancient monuments, including Bilad Sur Castle, As Sinaysilah Castle, Al `Ayjah Castle, Fanar Ras Al Meel and Ras Al Hadd Castle. It also has a number of valleys, the most prominent being Wadi Shab and Wadi Tiwi, in addition to Ras Al Hadd where the Turtle Sanctuary at Ras Al Jinz lies.

Turtle Reserve
Wadi Tiwi and Wadi Shab
Nizwa

The capital of Oman in the early days of Islam, was the cradle of ardent intellectual activity and produced generations of Omani scientists, scholars and historians. That’s why it has been called “the egg of Islam”. Its towering historic castle still stands today as well as many forts, castles, ancient mosques and other beautiful tourist sites. Nizwa District is also famous for its many old houses.

Nizwa Fort
Jabal Shams
Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar Resort
Musandam

The Musandam Peninsula is located on the northern border of the Sultanate of Oman. The high mountains in this region rise for more than two thousand metres above sea level. The mountains spread out in a naturally geometrical way. This area also contains the most important waterway, The Strait of Hormuz.  The juxtaposition of sea and mountains is considered one of the exclusive features of this area. Excursions in boats and traditional ships give the visitor unforgettable enjoyment, while diving fans at the beautiful coral reefs can plunge to their hearts’ content. Archaeological sites also abound in this area. Khasab is the Governorate of Musandam's regional centre and is located 570 kilometres from Muscat. Khasab, home to Khasab Port, it is located in the far north of the governorate and takes its name from its fertile soil. Khasab Governorate is famous for its magnificent villages and the thrilling roads that lead its mountain tops. Khasab can be reached by daily flights from Muscat, by sea in fast ferries and by car through a road that cuts through the United Arab Emirates.

Six Senses Zighy Bay